dialogue

  1. Angela Knight

    Craft Silver Tongued Devils: Writing Dialogue that Sparkles with Angela Knight

    Dialogue is a writer's greatest tool when it comes to bringing a character to life. It communicates their beliefs, their emotions, and their relationships with others. It sets them apart from everyone else in the book and is a key ingredient in the story's believability. But how do you create...
  2. Brenda Chin

    Character MASTER CLASS: Creating Complex Characters with Brenda Chin

    Award-winning editor Brenda Chin has worked in the romance industry for more than 32 years. Throughout her many years with Harlequin, she had the opportunity to work with some of the best writers in the business, often buying their first book. Brenda is offering her expertise to help authors go...
  3. C

    Character Show Up Naked with Chris Redding

    Chris Redding will take you on a funny and fun journey of discovery about men including why they act the way they do and how they express emotions. She’ll talk about how our society has socialized them and the stages they go through in life. At the end of class you will be able to write more...
  4. K

    Discussion Week Four Lesson Six

    Tags Tags at the beginning, in the middle, or at the end of a line or two of dialogue, attribute that dialogue to a particular character. They can be in the form of action or speech tags. They clarify who is speaking in a scene while keeping the reader immersed in the scene. Speech Tags...
  5. Joni M. Fisher

    Character Crafting Memorable Dialog with Joni Fisher

    We’ve all slogged through novels with boring, predictable, or chit-chat dialog. In many genres, dialog makes up half of the novel, so dialog can make or break your bond with readers. You can learn how to craft purposeful, quotable dialog by discovering and applying techniques used by...
  6. K

    Discussion Week Three Lesson Five

    Internal Dialogue There is a difference between internal dialogue and internal monologue. Monologue is the character thinking to themselves as they sort through a problem or their feelings toward a certain person or situation. Although monologue is narration, the reader is still in the...
  7. K

    Discussion Week Two Lesson Four

    Here are some more tips to consider on how to write dialogue. Don’t Overuse Character Names For some reason, many writers use character names in dialogue to identify for the reader who is who. In this example, overusing character names in dialogue is not realistic. The characters know who they...
  8. K

    Discussion Week Two Exercise Two

    Exercise II: In order to keep all your characters from sounding the same, they each need their own voice. As the author you need to know them so well you can hear the way they talk in your head. James Scott Bell, in his book, How to Write Dazzling Dazzling Dialogue suggests creating a voice...
  9. K

    Discussion Week Two Lesson Three

    How To Write Dialogue You may sometimes have to do a bit of research in order to gain a better understanding of how your characters might speak. For my character Johnny in Lost Hearts, I read two books on the mountain dialects of people from Appalachia and the Ozarks. I have books on the old...
  10. K

    Discussion Welcome

    Dialogue—How to Write Page-Turning Dialogue 2021 October Workshop presented on-line for Savvy Authors Welcome All, Thank you for joining me for this on-line workshop, Page-Turning Dialogue. I hope to make this a fun class with lots of discussion. Feel free to offer your suggestions or tips...
  11. K

    Pacing-Tension Page Turning Dialogue with Kathy Otten

    One of the most common reasons manuscripts are rejected is because the author has told too much of the story and failed to engage the agent, editor, or reader by showing action. Dialogue is action. It adds tension, conflict, and drama to your story. It’s one of the best ways to engage your...
  12. TereMichaels

    Character It Takes a Village: Writing Supporting Characters with Tere Michaels

    An exploration of world-building, development of plot and main characters through secondary characters. Introduction At the end of the day, no matter what the genre or trope, whether it’s happening in Alabama or on Mars, we are all trying to create the best possible characters to tell our...
  13. LC Hayden

    Lecture Dialog: Lesson 2: Attributions

    Dialog: Lesson 2: Attributions Attributions. Ahh. Perhaps one of the most controversial topics in an author’s career. Really? Yep. So what exactly are attributions? They are the words that tag the speaker. They let the reader know which of your characters said what. So what’s so...
  14. JMPaquette

    Lecture Step Two: Fix Pesky Dialogue Formatting Stuff

    Step Two: Fix Pesky Dialogue Formatting Stuff First, Stuff You Should Know (a quick review) Editors can tweak your formatting, but it certainly makes it easier when you do some of the work beforehand—especially for dialogue. Review the Rules: Note: I used images here to preserve the...
  15. Pamela Jaye Smith

    Lecture BEYOND - Lesson Three "Mythic Statements"

    BEYOND THE HEROINE’S JOURNEY LESSON #3 – Mythic Statements Pamela Jaye Smith Mythic Themes help align your story and give it internal integrity and universality. But it does not stop there. There are more Mythic Tools available to strengthen and enhance your story. Some of the most important...
  16. K

    Homework Week IV Exercise IV

    If you want to try something for fun, here is a really terrible scene. It has the elements of conflict and tension, but has been poorly executed. Thinking about the elements of internal and external conflict, try rewriting this scene. You wouldn't have to incorporate all the elements, just use...
  17. Pamela Jaye Smith

    Lecture Lesson Three - Beyond - "Mythic Statements"

    LESSON #3 – Mythic Statements Pamela Jaye Smith Mythic Themes help align your story and give it internal integrity and universality. But it does not stop there. There are more Mythic Tools available to strengthen and enhance your story. Some of the most important have to do with dialogue...
  18. Allie Pleiter

    Lecture Session 8 - Quick Tips for better dialogue

    We’ve come to our final session! I hope this class has helped you see new possibilities for the dialogue in your stories. You’ve learned how dialogue can: display stress or anger quickly define a character instantly establish a scene or circumstance leverage the power of a lie allow a...
  19. Allie Pleiter

    Lecture Session 7 - Ending well

    As writers, we want to give our readers a satisfying ending. A great final scene or line is one of the surest ways to win a reader’s heart and keep them coming back for whatever we write next. Great last lines stick with us. And while narrative can do the job, dialogue packs the most final...
  20. Allie Pleiter

    Lecture Session 6 - Surprising your reader

    Readers love to be surprised. Just like us (because we’re all avid readers, too, right?), they love plot twists, characters who make shocking decisions, or events that turn out the way no one expected. While readers love to feel “in the know,” the minute they feel as if they’re sure how...