conflict

  1. Brenda Chin

    Pacing-Tension MASTER CLASS: Creating Conflict that Works with Brenda Chin

    Award-winning editor Brenda Chin has worked in the romance industry for more than 32 years. Throughout her many years with Harlequin, she had the opportunity to work with some of the best writers in the business, often buying their first book. Brenda is offering her expertise to help authors go...
  2. Deborah Bailey

    Homework Lecture 3

    Homework Even if you haven't done Monday or Wednesday's homework, no problem. If you want to catch up, check out the previous homework threads. Answer one or all of the questions. 1. Have you ever used cliffhangers at the end of a book? How did that work out? 2. Do you have a way of whetting...
  3. Deborah Bailey

    Lecture Lecture 3 - Building Conflict & Avoiding Cliffhangers

    Lecture 3 Sorry this is bit late this morning. A meeting ran longer than I expected. So, let's get started. :) Welcome back to the class! Today we're covering tips for building overall conflict so that you can get readers to continue the series without cliffhangers. Story Conflict Drives...
  4. K

    Plot-Structure Bumps in the Road—Building Conflict in Your Story with Multi-Published Author Kathy Otten

    Do you want to write a story your reader can't put down? In this workshop we'll examine what conflict is and how uncertainty and failure build drama and tension in your story. Week One--What is Conflict? A. External Conflict B. Internal Conflict Week Two--Increasing External Conflict A...
  5. Deborah Bailey

    Homework Lecture 2

    Homework Even if you haven't done Monday's homework, no problem. :) If you want to catch up, check out the Lecture 1 homework. Answer some or all of the questions. 1. What is your overall story problem (or main conflict) to be resolved for the series? 2. What is the main conflict to be...
  6. SuzanneJefferies

    Genre Romance Writers: Getting to Grips with Inner Conflict with Suzanne Jefferies

    What makes a great romance novel is the inner conflict that the lovers experience. Yet, working out our characters' inner conflict can be intimidating! But, it needn’t be. In this workshop, we’ll talk about: What inner conflict is Why inner conflict is important How to create inner conflict...
  7. Landra Graf

    Pacing-Tension 5 W's of Conflict with Landra Graf

    Conflict is the reason stories happen. Conflict is keeping a romance from blossoming, a hero from reaching his goal, a villain trying to stop a hero, or even a killer from being stopped. Nine times out of ten a book falls flat because the conflict is non-existent and in this one-week course...
  8. LC Hayden

    Lecture Lesson 10: The middle

    Lesson 10: The middle It’s now time to devise a plot where the characters will take the reader from opening to ending. This is achieved by using a series of incidents, the specific happenings in the story. But how do you come up with these incidents? Begin by re-reading your premise. Now ask...
  9. Deborah Bailey

    Lecture Three-Act Structure

    This example of the Three-Act Structure is from my class about the Heroine's Journey. Three-Act Structure ACT I 1. Perfect World: the character is stuck in a world that has stopped his/her inner growth 2. Realization/Betrayal: the character is pushed to make a decision after something...
  10. LC Hayden

    Lecture Dialog: Lesson 7: Dialog that Gives Information

    Dialog: Lesson 7: Dialog that Gives Information Please analyze the following dialog: Manny pushed his plate away and faced his wife. “Did you know that Debbie, our niece, is turning eighteen in a couple of days?” “Of course, I did. Her parents, my sister and her husband, Eric and Sandy, have...
  11. LC Hayden

    Lecture Dialog: Lesson 4: Creating Good Dialog

    Dialog: Lesson 4: Creating Good Dialog When I was first learning to write dialog, I always heard the following advice: write the way people speak. That made sense to me. So I figured what a better way to learn how people speak than to eavesdrop. Here’s what I heard when I decided to do that...
  12. Deborah Bailey

    Genre How to Maintain Romantic Conflict with Deb Bailey

    Without conflict there is no story. Your characters have to grow and they have to be challenged. They fall in love, break up and make up until the HEA or HFN. How do you keep the tension and conflict as they go through their story arc? What keeps them going and what conflicts do they have to...
  13. LC Hayden

    Lecture Lesson 4 Using Time to Add Suspense

    Lesson 4 Using Time to Add Suspense Time is often forgotten by a lot of authors, yet if used correctly, it can add that edge-of-your-seat suspense authors want to achieve in their writing. Consequently, a wise author will, whenever possible, add the element of time to increase the tension in...
  14. LC Hayden

    Lecture Lesson 3 Developing the Threat

    Lesson 3 Developing the Threat How you develop the threat or conflict you’ve created has a lot to do with keeping the readers glued to your pages. One sure way to make sure this happens is to always surprise your readers. If he suspects something is going to happen and it does, this will slowly...
  15. LC Hayden

    Lecture Lesson 2 Establishing a Threat

    Lesson 2 Establishing a Threat Suspense is such an important technique that in order to correctly establish it, you, as the author, need to weave it into your story even before you set pen to paper or as in today’s case, fingers to computer keys. Ask yourself, what is the threat that the...
  16. terrimain

    Craft Developing a Premise and a Story Arc with Terri Main

    We combine Premise and Story Arc into the first course. The premise forms the foundation and a way to test the story idea which leads to creating a story arc. Here's the description of the course: You have an idea for a novel, but it takes more than a vague idea to have a viable story premise...
  17. Angela Knight

    Lecture Lesson 2: Plotting with the plotting grid

    **Note: this lesson was originally written for my Braiding Conflict to Climax class. Even if you’re writing a book where the only external conflict is the one between the hero and heroine, (or hero and hero, or heroine and heroine, or hero, heroine and hero, etc., etc.) the core point is that...
  18. Angela Knight

    Lecture Introduce yourselves!

    Hi, folks! I'm so pleased you decided to join me this weekend. I'd like each of you to introduce yourselves and give me some idea of what you want to get from this class. To give you an idea of what I have planned: I'm going to be posting a pair of character and plot planning sheets designed...
  19. Angela Knight

    Craft Conflict as the Building Blocks of Plot and Character with Angela Knight

    Without conflict, there is no story. Plots are built of blocks of conflict—internal, external and romantic. In this lesson, Angela discusses tools you can use to brainstorm your conflicts and design characters who butt heads.
  20. Pamela Jaye Smith

    Lecture BEYOND - Lesson Seven "Twins"

    BEYOND THE HEROINE’S JOURNEY LESSON #7 – “Twins” Pamela Jaye Smith The nature of the universe is duality -- light/dark, up/down, positive/negative, constructive/destructive, etc. Likewise human nature is infused with duality – animus/anima, self/shadow, friends/lovers, kind/cruel...