premise

  1. Amdenisch

    Plot-Structure From Premise to Plot with Anna Denisch

    A class designed to take the idea and opening scenes of a story and turn it into a full-fledged finished product. Using a method involving character needs and oppositions, writers will learn to churn out a list of ideas, create detailed scenes from those ideas, and figure out the best ending...
  2. LC Hayden

    Lecture Lesson 4: Choosing the Viewpoint Character

    Lesson 4: Choosing the Viewpoint Character By now you should have made character profiles on all of your main characters, including one on each of the villains. That means that you have an assortment of characters bouncing in your head. One of those will become your viewpoint character...
  3. LC Hayden

    Lecture Lesson 3: The Premise

    Lesson 3: The Premise Once you’ve finished profiling your characters, you’ll need to focus on the novel’s premise, which is one broad sentence (as opposed to a specific sentence) description of the novel’s plot. Notice the word sentence, singular. If in one sentence you can’t tell me what your...
  4. LC Hayden

    Lecture Lesson 4: Crafting Mystery: The Process of Plotting

    Lesson 4: Crafting Mystery: The Process of Plotting You are now ready to start creating the story. The best way to do this is by writing the premise, which is the one sentence that states your character’s objectives and difficulties. This is not a detailed account of the story’s complete...
  5. LC Hayden

    Lecture Lesson 3: The Premise

    Lesson 3: The Premise Once you’ve finished profiling your characters, you’ll need to focus on the novel’s premise, which is one broad sentence (as opposed to a specific sentence) description about the novel’s plot. Notice the word sentence, singular. If in one sentence you can’t tell me what...
  6. Amdenisch

    Craft From Premise to Plot with Anna Denisch

    A class designed to take the idea and opening scenes of a story and turn it into a full-fledged finished product. Using a method involving character needs and oppositions, writers will learn to churn out a list of ideas, create detailed scenes from those ideas, and figure out the best ending...
  7. Peter Andrews

    Craft Promise of the Premise with Peter Andrews

    What’s your story about? When people ask this question, they are interested in the concept behind it, the idea that makes it intriguing. They want an answer that raises questions and suggests possibilities. As a writer, you want these things, too. After all, if your story’s a novel, you’ll need...
  8. terrimain

    Craft Developing a Premise and a Story Arc with Terri Main

    We combine Premise and Story Arc into the first course. The premise forms the foundation and a way to test the story idea which leads to creating a story arc. Here's the description of the course: You have an idea for a novel, but it takes more than a vague idea to have a viable story premise...
  9. LC Hayden

    Lecture Lesson 4: Crafting Mystery: The Process of Plotting

    Lesson 4: Crafting Mystery: The Process of Plotting You are now ready to start creating the story. Best way to do this is by writing the premise, which is the one sentence that states your character’s objectives and difficulties. This is not a detailed account of the story’s complete events...
  10. LC Hayden

    Lecture Lesson 3: The Premise

    Lesson 3: The Premise Once you’ve finished profiling your characters, you’ll need to focus on the novel’s premise, which is one broad sentence (as opposed to a specific sentence) description about the novel’s plot. Notice the word sentence, singular. If in one sentence you can’t tell me what...
  11. Pamela Jaye Smith

    Lecture Beyond - Lesson Two - An Overview of Mythic Themes

    An overview of Mythic Themes: personal, romances, families, quests and adventures, etc. Pamela Jaye Smith Your story, when aligned with a Mythic Theme, gains internal integrity and universality. In today’s crowded media market where there is often more enthusiasm than talent, and more...
  12. LC Hayden

    Lecture Lesson 3: The Premise

    Lesson 3: The Premise Once you’ve finished profiling your characters, you’ll need to focus on the novel’s premise, which is one broad sentence (as opposed to a specific sentence) description about the novel’s plot. Notice the word sentence, singular. If in one sentence you can’t tell me what...
  13. Pamela Jaye Smith

    Lecture MYTH, MAGIC, METAPHYSICS - Lesson One

    BEYOND THE HERO’S JOURNEY Other Powerful Mythic Themes by Pamela Jaye Smith Having trouble making your story fit the pattern of The Hero’s Journey? Can’t quite make those paradigms match your own characters and plot? Maybe that’s because your story is actually based on a different...
  14. shannon donnelly

    Homework Writing the Regency - What's Your Premise?

    Now that we're a little ways into the lectures, here is a place to post your premise (or what you're thinking about) for a Regency-set story. The premise can be character based (for example, a story I wrote started with the premise of a woman looking at three young girls playing on a lawn--and...